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Matching Distance Education With Cognitive Styles in Various Levels of Higher Education
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, , , , Louisiana Tech Univ., United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Norfolk, VA ISBN 978-1-880094-41-9 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

Technological advances in distance education have resulted in a myriad mediums available for educators to deliver course materials. As technology pervades higher education, educators should be mindful of what mediums and materials can lead to successful learning for the various individuals the course will be reaching. In order to maximize learning potential, courses need to be tailored to the learning styles or "cognitive styles" of the students in each course. The greatest diversity of cognitive styles will undoubtedly be seen in general introductory courses that are required of all university students. However, this diversity will generally narrow as students gravitate toward their field of specialization. With the increasing number of non-traditional students (over age 22), educators must also meet the challenge of designing courses that are directed toward the cognitive styles of a population that may not be as technologically savvy as their younger counterparts. Equally important is the question of, "Is distance education appropriate for all students?" During the first years of college, students are learning valuable social and relationship skills. For this population, the convenience and cost efficiency of distance education may come at the expense of interpersonal development.

Citation

Jenkins, S., Buboltz, W., Wilkinson, L. & Beatty, S. (2001). Matching Distance Education With Cognitive Styles in Various Levels of Higher Education. In J. Price, D. Willis, N. Davis & J. Willis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2001--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 208-212). Norfolk, VA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved February 3, 2023 from .

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